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Slavic Linguistics

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Graduate students in Slavic linguistics are required to complete a series of four courses, on Old Church Slavonic, the history of the Russian language, Russian phonology and morphology, and a fourth course consisting of an approved elective in Slavic or general linguistics. These courses are generally offered every other year, so that students interested in concentrating in linguistics should take all the Slavic linguistics courses that are offered in their first year, so as to be able to complete the program on time. After completing the Old Church Slavonic course, students may apply to conduct research with Professor Vakareliyska on medieval Slavic liturgical texts. Students also are required to write an M.A. thesis during their second year. As in other fields of concentration, students will be expected to pass a master’s exam in Slavic linguistics (typically in the winter quarter of the second year) and to write a thesis (typically As in other fields of concentration, students will be expected to pass a master’s exam in Slavic linguistics (typically in the winter quarter of the second year) and to write a thesis (typically in the spring of the second year).

Faculty

Cynthia Vakareliyska, Professor of Linguistics. Ph.D. Harvard University, 1990. Publications include The Curzon Gospel. Vol. I: An Annotated Edition, Vol. II: A Linguistic and Textual Introduction, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008, and many scholarly articles. Research areas are medieval Slavic manuscript studies (Bulgarian gospels and calendars of saints); multiple linguistic and cultural self-identities (case study of the Russian Germans of Poland and Lithuania); and modern Bulgarian syntax. Teaching areas: Slavic linguistics (Old Church Slavonic, History of the Russian Language, Russian Phonology and Morphology); syntax; historical linguistics; gender linguistics; language disorders.